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Local Group Web Manager: Jane Tomlinson - CPRE Oxfordshire
Local Group Web Manager: Jane Tomlinson

Local Group Web Manager: Jane Tomlinson

Jane Tomlinson, PR manager, CPRE Oxfordshire

Monday, 10 September 2018 12:54

West Oxfordshire Local Plan Approved

The Inspector’s report on the West Oxfordshire Local Plan has now been published, finding the Plan sound subject to Main Modifications.

Oxfordshire County Council Minerals and Waste Local Plan: Part 2 – Site Allocations

Issues and Options Consultation – Deadline 4pm Wednesday 3rd October 2018

The Cherwell LP Part 1 Review Examination in Public will start with a One Day Pre-Hearing Meeting purely focused on whether the proposed level of unmet need can be considered sound and if so, whether it meets the exceptional circumstances test to justify release of Green Belt.

Tuesday, 14 August 2018 09:50

Vacancy: Chair of CPRE West Oxfordshire

CPRE Oxfordshire is looking for a new Chairperson to help co-ordinate our activity in West Oxfordshire.

Need Not Greed Oxfordshire (NNGO) is hosting this public event to raise awareness of the JSSP and to encourage our decision-makers to enage with local communties.

Cllr Ian Hudspeth will be joining NNGO to discuss the JSSP on Monday 24th September, 7-9pm at Stanton St John Village Hall.

Over the autumn CPRE Oxfordshire will be hosting a number of public events to raise awareness of the JSSP and encourage our decision-makers to engage with local communities. The first of these will be held on:
Monday 17th September at Banbury Town Hall from 7-9pm. 
Cllr Barry Wood will be joining us to discuss the JSSP and what it could mean for Cherwell.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 12:52

Have your say

local plans

 

Step One: maximise your influence by attending events or workshops and, most importantly, respond in writing to consultations. Read more here...


Step Two: the local planning authority is not required legally to consult the public at this stage. If they do comment on the issues, vision and objectives. Read more here...

S
tep Three:
understand the spatial strategy and the Sustainability Appraisal.
This is a key stage to comment and influence the plan. Read more here...

S
tep Four:
understand policies and proposals.
You may have an opportunity to comment or you may not see the full text of the Local Plan until it's published. Read more here...

Step Five: responding to the formal consultation on the pre-submission draft version of the Local Plan.
Once the local planning authority is happy with its Local Plan it must publish it for a formal consultation period of at least six weeks and make it available at the council offices, other appropriate locations and on its website. At this stage formal representations can be made in writing or electronically e.g. via a website or email.
This is your last chance to have your say on the contents of the Local Plan. Even if you have made comments at an earlier stage it will be worth looking again to see if your comments have been taken on board. If not, you may want to make your comments again as a formal representation. Importantly, all representations made at the publication stage are provided to the inspector who examines the plan. If you don't respond to this version you will not have an opportunity to comment or speak at the Examination. Read more here...

Commenting on the tests of soundness

Local Plans are required to meet the tests of soundness. This means they should be: positively prepared; justified; effective; and consistent with national policy.

Questions to ask yourself:

  • Is the plan positively prepared?
    Does the plan seek to meet the local needs for housing, land for businesses, community facilities, infrastructure (transport, water, energy), education, shops, facilities for sport and leisure etc., which have been identified through the studies which make up the evidence base?
  • Is it justified?
    Is the chosen strategy the best one compared with the alternatives considered? Is it clear how the Sustainability Appraisal has informed the plan (the Sustainability Appraisal report should set this out, and can help you to compare alternative options)? Has the plan been prepared with participation of the community? Is it clearly founded on evidence, backed up by facts?
  • Is it effective?
    Is there information on how the plan will be delivered during its life time (e.g. an 'implementation plan')? Does this say whether other delivery partners (e.g. strategic rail and highway authorities, the Environment Agency, water companies) are signed up to the plan? Is there an indication of when sites will come forward? Is it clear how the plan will be monitored? Is it flexible - able to deal with changing circumstances (e.g. what if a big site doesn't come forward for development when expected)?
  • Is it consistent with national policy as set out in the National Planning Policy Framework?

Step Six: submission version of the Local Plan. 
Once the local planning authority has considered all the representations received at the publication stage, it can amend the plan before submitting it to the Secretary of State to be considered by an independent inspector at an Examination. The local planning authority is required to provide a written summary of all the issues raised, both during the engagement stage and publication stage, to the inspector. They must also say how issues raised at the publication stage have been addressed in the plan. Read more here...

Step Seven: take part in the Examination.
The Local Plan will be considered by an independent Planning Inspector who will assess whether the Plan has been prepared ensuring 'duty to co-operate', legal and procedural requirements. The Inspector will also consider all the representations made and the evidence prepared by the local planning authority. The Inspector will decide if a hearing is required and, if so, what issues will be covered. The Inspector must focus on the soundness of the plan.
If your objections have not been overcome at the submission stage you may decide to register to speak or make further comment at the Hearing. Read more here...

Step Eight: Inspector's recommendation, approval and adoption.
Following the Examination, the Inspector will make a recommendation to the Secretary of State and the local planning authority. The Inspector may find the Plan 'unsound' in which case the local planning authority cannot adopt it without significant changes requiring further consultation and re-examination.
When adopted, look out for planning applications implementing the Local Plan and influence the quality of development in your area. 
Read about planning and how to respond to planning applications.

 



 

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 11:50

What Are Local Plans?

Local Plans set out the big decisions on planning for the future of your community and land. They outline the long-term strategy for each planning authority. England's planning system is designed to ensure that future development is always in the public interest and stops speculative development.

Monday, 16 July 2018 10:43

The Issues

NNGO are campaigning for a future for Oxfordshire which meets the real needs of local people not speculator greed.

Campaigning for:

  • carefully meeting the need to house an increase in Oxfordshire's population of about 10% by 2031, more in line with the national average growth projections.
  • the right kind of houses, in the right place, for people in real need and at the right price - for rental or purchase.
  • infrastructure that is exploited to the full, but avoiding overstretch, with investment in public transport.
  • focused development, prioritising brownfield sites, respecting the views of local communities and recognising the value of our environment.
  • support for a range of sectors, including rural businesses, tied to local employment needs. Oxfordshire currently has virtually full employment.
  • sustainable development, serving the needs and interests of Oxfordshire's residents.

Campaigning against:

  • an imposed 'growth at all costs' approach that only benefits speculators.
  • 30% population growth by 2031 and housebuilding more than double any rate previously achieved. 100,000 new houses by 2031=2 new Oxfords.
  • unaffordable, inappropriate estates not co-located with jobs.
  • infrastructure pushed beyond its capacity leading to congestion, flooding, pollution and pressure on our natural resources: water, gas, minerals etc.
  • the imposition of a dreamt up 85,000 jobs by 2031, irrespective of local employment needs. Job creation needs to be more in line with national average population growth projections of 10%.
  • unsustainable development promoted by the undemocratic Local Enterprise Partnership.
Monday, 16 July 2018 10:22

Join NNGO

Become a coalition member

Is your community under threat from Oxfordshire's unrealistic and unwelcome growth targets?

We believe that by working together we are bteer placed to promote an alternative vision that is not based on forced economic growth but which focusses instead on local people's real needs.

Need Not Greed Oxfordshire invite local community organisations to join the coalition.

Please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to discuss how your organisation can join.

To find out how to set up your own campaign group visit our Campaigning page to read tips and advice.

 

Individual supporters

Individuals are encouraged to support the campaign by signing up to the Need Not Greed Newsletter and visiting the news page for details about campaign activities.

Supporters can also donate to the campaign via Just Giving.

Or you could consider joining your local Coalition Group.

No group near you? To find out how to set up your own Campaign group visit our Campaigning page.

Alternatively, you could join CPRE Oxfordshire which fights for the protection of the Oxfordshire countryside, and provides the Secretariat for NNGO.

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